Anthemis

Anthemis is a sun-loving plant, and although many of the species have little merit as cut flowers, there are some chamomiles, to give them their common name, which are of value. These are chiefly varieties of A. tinctoria, of which ‘Perry’s Variety’, ‘Mrs Buxton’ and Toddon Gold’ are good. These are, however, surpassed by `Grallagh Gold’ and ‘Beauty of Grallagh’, both of which make very bushy plants 2 ft high and sometimes nearly as much wide. These are literally smothered, from June to August, in rich, golden, daisy-like flowers of fine lasting quality. I prefer `Grallagh Gold’, which is stiffer growing and rarely needs support. Spring planting is best and a good but not rich soil should be given. If the plant is cut back in August, some of the fresh growths produced will give late flowers and the new leaves will in any case give winter protection to the roots. Propagate by cuttings or divisions.

Anthemis

Most anthemis flower freely and for a long time, but their chief fault is that of a short life. The varieties of Anthemis tinctoria are especially prone. The yellow daisy-type flowers come on somewhat twiggy and not very erect growth 2 to 2 ½ ft. high from June to late August and, if the woody rootstock fails to produce new basal growth in autumn, there can be no survival.

Grallagh Gold is even trickier than the light yellow Wargrave or Mrs Buxton, but the dwarfer species, A. sancti-johannis, is, in my experience, much more reliable. It has the same deep green somewhat parsley-like leaves and the deep yellow flowers are carried quite neatly on 20-in. Bushes.

 

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