HARDY PERENNIALS: DIANTHUS

Pinks’ never fail to please, not only because of their bright colours, but because most of them are scented. All kinds like sun and well drained soil and are often happy in thin chalky, stoney, or sandy conditions. With none of them exceeding 18 inches or so in height, they come in for frontal positions and some of the neater growing ones, make excellent edging subjects to a path, rosebed or south facing shrubby border—apart from a rock garden. From seed, a mixture can be expected, not so much in height as in colour, but this, whether home raised or by purchase, is often no disability, for all flower at much the same time, between early June and August. Those that grow no more than about 6 inches high are sometimes called Alpine Hybrids, but are none the less fully adaptable at the front of taller perennials. They can be had in both double and single strains or varieties, but generally the doubles are taller and come under the true category of Pinks. In these, the old fashioned D. ‘Mrs. Sinkins’, with double white flowers is still popular as is the pink flowered D. ‘Excelsior’, with D. ‘Mrs. Pil-kington’, an excellent light pink and D. ‘Ipswich Crimson’ a good double red. D. ‘Sam Barlow’ is white with a crimson flecked centre, whilst D. ‘Paddington’ is pink, with a dark red centre fleck. These named varieties are increased by cuttings or by divisions in autumn. Straggly shoots should be tucked in and well firmed so as to encourage rooting along the stem. Taller single flowered varieties can be obtained in a good colour range as a mixture from seed, and these give a long season in flower with heights up to 18 inches. For a really dwarf one, with deep green foliage, the D. deltoides ‘Flashing Light’ is outstanding the foliage makes a carpet, but the small flowers on 4-6 inches stems are so profuse that the plant becomes a blazing red cushion of colour from June to August.

DIANTHUS Dwarf single

DIANTHUS Dwarf single

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.