HARDY PERENNIALS: PACHYSANDRA

P. terminalis is inserted because it is the kind of plant many gardeners need — of something to grow near or beneath trees. It is of evergreen sub-shrubby growth, giving permanent and trouble free ground cover and able to compete with the roots of trees and shrubs once established. It is especially useful as a ground cover between shrubs and has a slow, sure spread. The type is green leaved but P. terminalis variegata is brighter. Both have flowers of rather non-descript appearance, which neither add nor detract. Both can be divided safely in spring, since their spread is a case of rooting as they go. Though this is undoubtedly one of the best evergreen ground coverers, able to fill spaces in many an otherwise inhospitably shady place, it is rather slow to become established. In the first year plants take hold, but show little spread. If planted 12 inches apart, they should meet to become a complete carpet, touching each other in 2-3 years and if after that one wishes to extend the area, rooted pieces can be taken out without being missed.

PACHYSANDRA terminalis

PACHYSANDRA terminalis

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