House Plants for Sunny Windowsills

House Plants for Sunny Windowsills

These are plants that need ample light, although no plant should be subjected to direct hot sunlight through glass. A light curtain or blind should be drawn to shield them from the direct rays of summer sun, or the plants can be moved further into the room and put back on the sill later in the day when the sun has lost its midday heat.

Agave (American Aloe) make attractive foliage plants for the house when young, as they are easy to grow. They welcome the brightest of light, but become too large for small windowsills eventually and the stout spines on the leaves become a hazard. Of the smaller species, A. albicans from Mexico, is perhaps the best, with small rosettes of broad whitish leaves, edged with horny teeth. Plants may be placed out of doors in pots in summer.

Aloe are evergreen succulent plants, native to South Africa. There are several species attractive for their fleshy leaves and popular for their hardiness under fluctuating indoor conditions. A. variegata, the Partridge-breasted Aloe, with its dark green leaves, banded with white markings, and upright spike of pale orange tubular flowers, is well worth growing.

echeveria

echeveria

Echeveria is a genus of about 150 succulents that originated in the south and west of North America. E. setosa is one of the most decorative varieties with low rosettes of pointed leaves, closely covered with soft white bristles. Showy, red tipped, yellow flowers appear in summer.

Hoya carnosa comes from Queensland, Australia. It is an evergreen climbing plant, capable of growing up to 10 feet and easily managed, becoming more attractive with age. It is best trained up a trellis or a support by a window, but can also be grown as a trailer. The leaves are dark green, somewhat fleshy, oval and pointed. The starry flowers are fragrant and bloom for several weeks in spring and summer. It needs a summer temperature of 13° to 18° C with liberal watering and a winter temperature of about 10° C and very moderate watering.

Impatiens hybrids, which most people know as Busy Lizzies, are seldom out of flower, even in the winter months. They like a light, airy, summer position, liberal watering and occasional pinching out of shoots to keep plants bushy. The taller kinds benefit from staking, for their stems are very brittle. They flower well in quite small pots and benefit from being syringed in summer months and being kept fairly dry in winter. Propagation is by cuttings.

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