Sidalcea

There is something quite distinct about a plant which carries its flowers in spikes, and this is particularly so in the case of the sidalcea, which produces its colour just as the delphiniums are passing over. They are, therefore, very useful for giving a display during July and August. There are two or three dozen species, although comparatively few are of real use for the commercial grower. Sometimes known as Greek Mallows or ‘dwarf hollyhocks’, which gives a clue to their appearance, sidalceas do not ask for any special cultural conditions. They flourish in an open position and in any good soil, provided it is not too wet or cold, although moisture must never be lacking during the growing season. The flowers are valuable for cutting, while the plants are ideal for a really good herbaceous border. If lifted and divided every 3 or 4 years, they will be kept healthy, vigorous and enabled to produce plenty of flowers.

Sidalcea

The plants can be moved in the spring or autumn, and among the good varieties, all growing 3 ft or so in height, are ‘Candida’, white; ‘Rev. Page Roberts’, rose-pink; ‘Sussex Beauty’, bright rose; ‘Crimson Beauty’ and ‘Wensleydale’, rosy-red.

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